Category Archives: Calls for Papers

CFP: READING W.D. HOWELLS (1837-1920) A CENTURY LATER (NEMLA; deadline 9.30.19)

CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS:

READING W.D. HOWELLS (1837-1920) A CENTURY LATER

NEMLA, Boston, MA, March 5-8, 2020

In the 100th anniversary year of William Dean Howells’ death, NEMLA will hold its annual convention in the city that hosted the Ohioan’s rise to literary success and cultural celebrity. From very early in his career, Howells’ literary achievement has been inextricably intertwined, for better and for worse, with his public reputation and cultural influence. Accordingly, this panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of Howells’ life, career, influence, and writing, including but not limited to his novels, short stories, plays, poems, travel writing, and literary and cultural criticism. Papers that situate their particular topics within the history and possible futures of the reading and study of Howells are especially welcome. The panel is offered in cooperation with the W.D. Howells Society.

Submit paper abstracts of no longer than 500 words by September 30 via the NEMLA website, here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18089. The abstract submission interface opens on June 15. If you do not have a NEMLA account, open one for free here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/login.

If you intend to use media for your presentation, be sure to include that information in your user account when you submit your abstract. See the information under “Audiovisual Requests and Wireless Internet” for more information about available AV media, here: http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/chair.html#title_1622008448.

Authors of accepted proposals will be notified in early October; finalization of panel, with confirmed participants, will be completed by October 15. Presenters’ NEMLA membership/registration must be completed by December 7 for their names and paper titles to be included in the conference program.

 

 

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CFP: William Dean Howells Society – ALA 2019

William Dean Howells Society – ALA 2019

deadline for submissions:
January 15, 2019
full name / name of organization:
William Dean Howells Society
contact email:

The William Dean Howells Society will host two panels at the upcoming American Literature Association Conference in Boston, May 23-26, 2019.

1. William Dean Howells and the Affective Turn

In her recent work, Emotional Reinventions: Realist Era Representations Beyond Sympathy, Melanie V. Dawson argues that Howells and other realists introduced a new approach to the analysis and portrayal of affect. This new method, she contends, departed from sentimentalist conventions and anticipated the modernist emphasis on alterity and insular subjectivity.  For this panel, we seek presentations on matters of feeling, emotion, or embodiment in the work of William Dean Howells, as well as those that examine his writing from the perspective of affect theory. How did Howells’s treatment of affects diverge from earlier American literature? How have the critical reorientations of the affective turn shed new light on Howells and American literary realism?

2. New Approaches to The Rise of Silas Lapham

In honor of the recent publication of Paul R. Petrie’s new Norton Critical Edition of The Rise of Silas Lapham, we seek presentations that respond to the topics addressed in its selections, including (but not limited to) gender and genre, the politics of realism, and representations of class antagonism in the novel. We are also interested in presentations on teaching the novel, as well as new critical approaches to The Rise of Silas Lapham.

Please send abstracts to Andrew Ball (ball@math.harvard.edu) by January 15.

CFP: Howells Panels at ALA 2018

The William Dean Howells Society welcomes submissions for two panels at the 29th Annual American Literature Association Conference to be held in San Francisco, May 24-27, 2018.

Panel 1: William Dean Howells and Democracy 

Historically, the subject of Howells’s politics has been a matter of dispute. For some—most notably H. L. Mencken and Sinclair Lewis—Howells evinced a contemptibly timid conservatism that was an impediment to political progress. Whereas for others, like Timothy Parrish, Howells stands as the Gilded Age’s “most politically radical writer.” What is incontestable, however, is that politics remained a constant concern for Howells, from his early days as a legislative correspondent, to his time as consul, and finally as the nation’s preeminent critic and novelist. In his polemical criticism, for example, he framed Realist aesthetics as a means to actualizing America’s democratic ideals. In his column of July, 1887 he writes, “Democracy in literature is the reverse of [aristocratic aesthetics]. It wishes to know and to tell the truth…it does not care to paint the marvellous and impossible for the vulgar many, or to sentimentalize and falsify the actual for the vulgar few. Men are more like than unlike one another: let us make them know one another better, that they may be all humbled and strengthened with a sense of their fraternity.” Late in his career, political matters took center stage for Howells. Alone among his peers, he famously risked his reputation and position by defending those accused in the Haymarket Affair. However, though he’d become an avowed socialist and outspoken opponent of economic inequality who sided with workers in labor disputes, Howells was critical of strikes and direct action. In The World of Chance (1893) he writes, “the right way to universal prosperity and peace is the political way…we must have the true America in the true American way, by reasons, by votes, by laws, and not otherwise.” Throughout his career, Howells’s political sensibilities evolved, but his preoccupation with democracy was unwavering. For this panel, we invite proposals for presentations that examine the subject of democracy in Howells’s work.

Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Howells on the American presidency
  • Howells on protectionism vs. cosmopolitanism and globalization
  • Howells on the American nation, nationhood, citizenship
  • Howells on American exceptionalism
  • Howells’s critique of the Spanish-American War
  • Howells on foreign and / or domestic policy
  • Howells on social organization, utopianism, class struggle, direct action, etc.
  • Howells’s politicized aesthetics
  • Howells on American pluralism and diversity
  • Howells’s relation to political figures like Henry Adams, Henry George, John Hay, and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., among others

Panel 2: Open Topic

For this session, we invite proposals for presentations concerned with any aspect of Howells’s life and work.

Please submit 300-500 word abstracts to Andrew Ball (ajball79@icloud.com) by January 24. The subject of the email should be “Howells ALA 2018” and the proposal should include any A/V needs you will require.

https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2018/01/16/update-howells-and-democracy-ala-2018-deadline-extended

CFP: Howells Panels at ALA 2018

The William Dean Howells Society welcomes submissions for two panels at the 29th Annual American Literature Association Conference to be held in San Francisco, May 24-27, 2018.

Panel 1: William Dean Howells and Democracy 

Historically, the subject of Howells’s politics has been a matter of dispute. For some—most notably H. L. Mencken and Sinclair Lewis—Howells evinced a contemptibly timid conservatism that was an impediment to political progress. Whereas for others, like Timothy Parrish, Howells stands as the Gilded Age’s “most politically radical writer.” What is incontestable, however, is that politics remained a constant concern for Howells, from his early days as a legislative correspondent, to his time as consul, and finally as the nation’s preeminent critic and novelist. In his polemical criticism, for example, he framed Realist aesthetics as a means to actualizing America’s democratic ideals. In his column of July, 1887 he writes, “Democracy in literature is the reverse of [aristocratic aesthetics]. It wishes to know and to tell the truth…it does not care to paint the marvellous and impossible for the vulgar many, or to sentimentalize and falsify the actual for the vulgar few. Men are more like than unlike one another: let us make them know one another better, that they may be all humbled and strengthened with a sense of their fraternity.” Late in his career, political matters took center stage for Howells. Alone among his peers, he famously risked his reputation and position by defending those accused in the Haymarket Affair. However, though he’d become an avowed socialist and outspoken opponent of economic inequality who sided with workers in labor disputes, Howells was critical of strikes and direct action. In The World of Chance (1893) he writes, “the right way to universal prosperity and peace is the political way…we must have the true America in the true American way, by reasons, by votes, by laws, and not otherwise.” Throughout his career, Howells’s political sensibilities evolved, but his preoccupation with democracy was unwavering. For this panel, we invite proposals for presentations that examine the subject of democracy in Howells’s work.

Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Howells on the American presidency
  • Howells on protectionism vs. cosmopolitanism and globalization
  • Howells on the American nation, nationhood, citizenship
  • Howells on American exceptionalism
  • Howells’s critique of the Spanish-American War
  • Howells on foreign and / or domestic policy
  • Howells on social organization, utopianism, class struggle, direct action, etc.
  • Howells’s politicized aesthetics
  • Howells on American pluralism and diversity
  • Howells’s relation to political figures like Henry Adams, Henry George, John Hay, and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., among others

Panel 2: Open Topic

For this session, we invite proposals for presentations concerned with any aspect of Howells’s life and work.

Please submit 300-500 word abstracts to Andrew Ball (ajball79@icloud.com) by January 8. The subject of the email should be “Howells ALA 2018” and the proposal should include any A/V needs you will require.

https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2017/11/09/howells-and-democracy-w-d-howells-society-ala-2018

 

CFP: Howells Panels at ALA 2017

The William Dean Howells Society welcomes submissions for two panels at the 28th Annual American Literature Association Conference to be held in Boston, May 25-28, 2017.

Panel 1: On the Neglected Works of William Dean Howells

Though “the Dean of American letters” is acknowledged as a key figure in the history of American literature, critics have primarily focused on a small number of well-known works such as The Rise of Silas Lapham and A Haz- ard of New Fortunes. For this panel, we invite proposals for presentations that examine texts from Howells’s extensive body of work that have re- mained largely neglected, or those devoted to topics that have received less

attention. Potential topics could include but are not limited to:

  •   Howells’s late poetry
  •   Howells’s YA literature for children and adolescents
  •   Howells’s drama – his plays, farces, and sundry theatrical works
  •   Howells’s creative nonfiction
  •   Howells’s travel writing
  •   Howells’s journalism – from his political journalism to his criticism and editorial work
  •   Howells and the beneficiaries of his mentorship and critical praise

    such as, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Charles Chesnutt, Hamlin Garland, Stephen Crane, and Frank Norris among many others

  •   Howells and his contemporaries, such as James and Twain
  •   Howells as tastemaker – as combatant in the “Realism War” or pro-

    moter of European authors

  •   Howells and Modernism
  •   Howells and regionalism

    Panel 2: Open Topic

    For this session, we invite proposals for presentations concerned with any aspect of Howells’s life and work.

    Please submit 300-500 word abstracts to Andrew Ball (aball @ linden- wood.edu) by January 15. The subject of the email should be “Howells ALA 2017” and the proposal should include any A/V needs you will require.

CFP: W. D. Howells Sessions at ALA (Deadline 1.31.15)

Call For Papers: William Dean Howells Society Panels for ALA May, 2015

The William Dean Howells Society wel- comes submissions for two panels at the 2015 American Literature Association conference in Boston in May 2015.

Panel 1: A Radical Howells

We are seeking papers on the political di- mensions of William Dean Howells’ work. We are especially interested in accounts of Howells as a writer engaged with the radical ideas of his day, and we welcome fresh discussions of his lesser- known works under this rubric. Topics may in- clude the democracy of Howellsian realism, his defense of the Haymarket anarchists, his encoun- ters with Tolstoy – including the Russian’s em- brace of nonviolence and economic equality—late 19th century socialism, his views on women’s suf- frage, his membership in the NAACP, his social novels of the 1890s, and his anti-imperialism.

Panel 2: Open Topic

We are looking for insightful, original papers that address any aspect of Howells’s work.
Please submit your 200-250 word abstract and a current CV (or any questions) to Dan Mrozowski at

daniel.mrozowski @ trincoll.edu

by January 31, 2015.

CFP: The North American Review Bicentennial Creative Writing & Literature Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS
The North American Review Bicentennial Creative Writing & Literature Conference

Dates: June 11–13, 2015

Location: University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA

Keynotes: Martín Espada, Patricia Hampl, Steven Schwartz

The North American Review, the longest-lived literary magazine in the United States, is pleased to announce that it is now accepting submissions to its Bicentennial Creative Writing & Literature Conference, to be held on the campus of the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, IA, June 11-13, 2015. The editors invite proposals for individual papers, pre-formed panels (3-4 panelists), or roundtable discussions (4-6 participants).

·      Critical papers, panels, and roundtables may be submitted on any literary or cultural topic, theme, author, art work, or text that has some connection to the North American Review. Group society proposals are welcome.

·      Creative Writing proposals may include readings of your own creative work, explorations of the craft and theory of writing, or discussions of creative writing pedagogy, the publishing world, the professionalization of creative writing, or creative writing as a discipline in the university.

Visit https://northamericanreview.submittable.com/submit to upload your submission.

More details about the magazine and the conference can be found at http://northamericanreview.wordpress.com.

 The entire North American Review archives can be accessed digitally via the JSTOR database (http://www.jstor.org); issues appearing from 1815 to 1899 can be searched or browsed at Cornell University’s Making of America Website (http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moa); and an index of authors and subjects in the North American Review from 1815 to 1877 is available through Google Books (http://bit.ly/1mGlg5A). A list of notable contributors is available at http://northamericanreview.wordpress.com.

If you have a question or need assistance in locating a source, contact the conference director Jeremy Schraffenberger at schraffj@uni.edu.

A note from Professor Schraffenberger:

The current NAR editors would be eager to include papers, panels, and/or roundtables focused on Howells in the context of the North American Review. As I’m sure you know, Howells was a frequent contributor to the magazine; in addition to many articles and reviews, his novel The Son of Royal Langbrith was serialized in its pages. We’re also amenable, of course, to papers that are not solely NAR-centric but still explore his work both critically and creatively.